Saturday, August 9, 2014
Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Sunday, July 13, 2014
Friday, July 4, 2014
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
Extremely distracted at work bc FIFA all day. I need a third screen.

Extremely distracted at work bc FIFA all day. I need a third screen.

Sunday, June 15, 2014

(Source: slovekxx)

Monday, June 9, 2014
 UES, I will miss you and it’s been real.

UES, I will miss you and it’s been real.

Wednesday, June 4, 2014
humansofnewyork:

"I taught English in Thailand for a year, and I tried to continue in education when I returned to the United States, but it wasn’t nearly as fulfilling for me. In Thailand, teachers are really revered. In the hierarchy of prestige, it goes: kings, then monks, then teachers. Parents would always be asking for advice. My students would come up and hug me in the streets. It was almost like I was being welcomed into the families of my students, and we were working together toward education. Back in America, it felt like Home and School were two different zones. It felt more isolating. In Thailand, I definitely felt like I was making a difference. In America, it felt like ‘maybe’ I was making a difference.”

humansofnewyork:

"I taught English in Thailand for a year, and I tried to continue in education when I returned to the United States, but it wasn’t nearly as fulfilling for me. In Thailand, teachers are really revered. In the hierarchy of prestige, it goes: kings, then monks, then teachers. Parents would always be asking for advice. My students would come up and hug me in the streets. It was almost like I was being welcomed into the families of my students, and we were working together toward education. Back in America, it felt like Home and School were two different zones. It felt more isolating. In Thailand, I definitely felt like I was making a difference. In America, it felt like ‘maybe’ I was making a difference.”

Sunday, June 1, 2014
Wednesday, May 7, 2014
allthingslinguistic:

How Google converted translation into a problem of vector space mathematics

The new trick is to represent an entire language using the relationship between its words. The set of all the relationships, the so-called “language space”, can be thought of as a set of vectors that each point from one word to another. And in recent years, linguists have discovered that it is possible to handle these vectors mathematically. For example, the operation ‘king’ – ‘man’ + ‘woman’ results in a vector that is similar to ‘queen’.
It turns out that different languages share many similarities in this vector space. That means the process of converting one language into another is equivalent to finding the transformation that converts one vector space into the other.
This turns the problem of translation from one of linguistics into one of mathematics. So the problem for the Google team is to find a way of accurately mapping one vector space onto the other. For this they use a small bilingual dictionary compiled by human experts–comparing same corpus of words in two different languages gives them a ready-made linear transformation that does the trick.

allthingslinguistic:

How Google converted translation into a problem of vector space mathematics

The new trick is to represent an entire language using the relationship between its words. The set of all the relationships, the so-called “language space”, can be thought of as a set of vectors that each point from one word to another. And in recent years, linguists have discovered that it is possible to handle these vectors mathematically. For example, the operation ‘king’ – ‘man’ + ‘woman’ results in a vector that is similar to ‘queen’.

It turns out that different languages share many similarities in this vector space. That means the process of converting one language into another is equivalent to finding the transformation that converts one vector space into the other.

This turns the problem of translation from one of linguistics into one of mathematics. So the problem for the Google team is to find a way of accurately mapping one vector space onto the other. For this they use a small bilingual dictionary compiled by human experts–comparing same corpus of words in two different languages gives them a ready-made linear transformation that does the trick.

Sunday, April 20, 2014
  • The cashier rings up my purchase.
  • Cashier: Do you have a card?
  • Me: I don't have a card, but can I give you my phone number instead?
  • Cashier: ..?
  • Me: I forgot to bring my card but I have my number.
  • Cashier: ... I meant credit card.
  • Me: [!] I'm sorry, I thought you meant rewards card.
  • Cashier: Haha for a second I thought you were giving me your number and I scored or something.
  • Me: [awkward silence]
  • Cashier: Do you still want to give me your number?
  • Me: [omg please stop]
Wednesday, April 9, 2014
Sunday, March 16, 2014

missing hk as always

(Source: mystic-revelations)